Then & Now: What It Means to be an Athlete

Then & NowAs I basked in the afterglow of a recent workout, I found myself reflecting on why exercise matters to me and what it really means to me.

I love to feel like an athlete. Several words help illustrate what my perception of an athlete:

Strong

Capable

Determined

Hardworking

Sweaty!

The more I thought about it, the realization dawned on me that I have always sought these feelings through exercise. As a tri-sport athlete in a small-town high school (I participated in volleyball, basketball, and track & field annually), I got my fill of feeling like an athlete through sports. As an adult, I have much less directed or structured athletic endeavors.

From the time I was in high school sports to adulthood, my drivers to reach that feeling of athleticism have changed substantially.

 

Competition with Others vs. Competition with Myself

In high school sports, being an athlete was very much geared toward being a better athlete than my competitors from other schools. I needed to be more than another person – more strong, more capable, just more. Now, I don’t much care where anyone else’s fitness skills are in relation to mine; if I can compete with myself and improve myself and my own fitness compared to where I was yesterday or last week or last year, I’m winning!

 

Stats vs. Health

In order to determine which of two people the better athlete is, sports statistics are used: race times, distances thrown, shots scored, wins/losses, etc. These days, I’m only comparing my statistics to my prior statistics. For me, fitness indicators include running pace, frequency of exercising, and pounds on the bench press bar. A few other numbers have been thrown into the mix, too – mainly, blood labs such as cholesterol and blood sugar that let us know if our bodies are healthy on the inside.

 

What I Can’t Do vs. What I Can Do

In competing with other athletes, it is important to find deficits and correct them to become a better contender. This results in more of a focus on can’t rather than can. For example, “I can’t consistently shoot free throws,” or “I can’t swim as fast as my competitor,” or “I can’t hit through that blocker.” When I compete only with myself, I get to focus on what I can do. Lately, my list includes, “I can run faster than before” and “I can lift more weight than last month” and “I can hold downward dog without wondering when the yoga instructor will let us change positions.” (That last one is a pretty fantastic accomplishment for me!)

 

Don’t get me wrong – sports are great! This simply reflects how my perspective on athleticism has changed over time

Whatever your reasons may be for seeking your version of athleticism, know that those are great and keep fueling that spark!

How to Take Nutrition Advice

How to Take Nutrition Advice

How to Take Nutrition AdviceThere is a huge amount of nutrition advice out there, some even legitimate. Nutrition and food are relatable to everyone, and so often, people are interested in how to change their body. There are a few things to know before jumping on someone’s nutrition wagon.

  1. You are unique. You have your body, not someone else’s. No matter how insistent someone is that this diet will make you look like [insert chosen celebrity here], it’s just not likely to be true unless you already share that person’s body type.
  2. Not everyone who has lost weight, gained muscle, cured their gastrointestinal discomfort, etc., is a nutrition expert. Nutrition is not a one-size-fits-all endeavor, and what another person has done may not be helpful for you, and may not even be recommended or healthy. Look for credentials from those who are offering nutrition advice to help decide its worth.
  3. You don’t need to follow every nutrition plan out there. As a kid, I always wondered why magazines had new workout and nutrition plans every month, instead of following up with the same one from the last issue. There is no way a person can continue piling on new rules and plans every month and find success, at least not at the cost of being very stressed. Once you figure out what works for you and helps move you toward your goals in a healthy way, stick with it.

Due to the sheer volume of nutrition information available at the click of a mouse (or bombarding you throughout the day), it can be tricky to figure out what’s noteworthy. When you find quality nutrition advice that works for you, have conviction in knowing that you are doing what is best for you and let the rest pass you by.

Habit is habit and not to be flug out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs one step at a time.
To keep a lamp burning, we have to keep putting oil in it.
Without forgiveness life is governed by an endless cycle of resentment and retaliation.